Prague (Czech: Praha) is the capital city and largest city in the Czech Republic. It is one of the largest cities of Central Europe and has served as the capital of the historic region of Bohemia for centuries. The city is famous for its unique medieval architecture, the historical centre of Prague is inscribed in the World Heritage List.This magical city of bridges, cathedrals, gold-tipped towers and church domes, has been mirrored in the surface of the swan-filled Vltava River for more than ten centuries. Almost undamaged by WWII, Prague’s medieval centre remains a wonderful mixture of cobbled lanes, walled courtyards, cathedrals and countless church spires all in the shadow of her majestic 9th century castle that looks eastward as the sun sets behind her. Prague is also a modern and vibrant city full of energy, music, cultural art, fine dining and special events catering to the independent traveler’s thirst for adventure. It is regarded by many as one of Europe’s most charming, colorful and beautiful cities, Prague has become the most popular travel destination in Central Europe along with Vienna and Krakow. Millions of tourists visit the city every year.Prague was founded in the later 9th century, and soon became the seat of Bohemian kings, some of whom ruled as emperors of the Holy Roman Empire. The city thrived under the rule of Charles IV, who ordered the building of the New Town in the 14th century – many of the city’s most important attractions date back to that age. The city also went under Habsburg rule and became the capital of a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. In 1918, after World War I, the city became the capital of Czechoslovakia. After 1989 many foreigners, especially young people, moved to Prague. In 1992, its historic centre was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. In 1993, Czechoslovakia split into two countries and Prague became capital city of the new Czech Republic.The Vltava River runs through Prague, which is home to about 2 million people in its metro area. The capital may be beautiful, but pollution often hovers over the city due to its location in the Vltava River basin. Prague has a temperate climate with variations throughout the year. Average temperatures in Prague you can find there.In the winter, Prague has definitely its own magic. The snow may cover the surface but it sooner or later melts, so it doesn’t usually last too long. However, the weather is pretty unpredictable so it very well may burst into a snow storm but that is not very common. In some years the weather is very mild with no snow at all, so beautiful snowy roofs are not guaranteed.Spring season is one of the best times to come for a visit, especially in the month of May with the flora beginning to bloom after months of hibernation.The summer is a very popular time to travel and you can expect to see an influx of tourism throughout the warmer months. The weather is warm and sunny but sometimes the heat waves can be overwhelming, so people with respiratory problems may have some trouble, this is also the country’s rainy season.Colorful and chilly – these two characteristics define the fall/autumn season. Getting dressed warmly is a must because the wind and overcast sky may get in your way. Nevertheless, there are also beautiful sunshine days that practically call you out for a walk.Many Prague residents have a small cottage (which can range from a shack barely large enough for garden utensils to an elaborate, multi-story dwelling) outside the city. There they can escape for some fresh air and country pursuits such as mushroom hunting and gardening. These cottages, called chata (plural form chaty, pronunciation of ch as in Bach), are treasured both as getaways and ongoing projects. Each reflects its owners’ character, as most of them were built by unorthodox methods. There were no Home Depots under communism. Chata owners used the typically Czech “it’s whom you know” chain of supply to scrounge materials and services. This barter system worked extremely well, and still does today. People had to be careful building these cottages to make them nice, but not too nice that the party officials would take them for themselves. Many were designed to look dilapidated on the outside, but on the inside they are nice and comfortable. Chaty are also sometimes used as primary residences by Czechs who rent out their city-centre apartments for enormous profit to foreigners who can afford to pay inflated rent.Confusingly, several incompatible district systems are used in Prague. Partially, different systems are from different historic periods, but at least three different systems are used today for different purposes. To make things even worse, a single district name can be used in all the systems, but with different meanings. For purposes of this guide, the “old” district system is used. In this “old” system, Prague is divided into ten numbered districts: Praha 1 through to Praha 10. If you encounter a higher district number, a different system is being used. For example, Praha 13 is part of the “old” Praha 5 district. The advantage of the “old” system of ten districts is that it is used on street signs and house numbers throughout the city, so you can always easily determine the “old” system district you are located in.Praha 1 is the oldest part of the city, the original ‘Town of Prague’, and has by far the densest number of attractions. Praha 2 also contains important historic areas. In this central area, the “old” district system (or any of the newer systems) is too crude to be practical, a finer division is needed. Traditional city “quarters” provide such a division. Their disadvantage is that they are somewhat incompatible with the modern district systems – although “quarters” are smaller than the “old” system districts, a single quarter can belong to two or even more districts. The advantage is that these central quarters are well known and widely used and identical with the homonymous cadastral areas shown on on street and house number signs along the “old” district designation, allowing easy orientation.Buildings in big cities in Czech Republic have two numbers, one blue and one red. The blue ones are the orientation numbers – it is the ordinal number of the building on its street. Historically these numbers always started from the end of the street which is closer to a river. As is normal in Europe, odd numbers belong on one side of the street and even numbers on the other. This allows you to find quickly the house you are looking for. The red numbers are related to the house register of the entire quarter (for example, Starí Misto), and thus usually correspond to the order the buildings in that district were constructed. Most people do not remember them

Airport: PRG Prague Ruzyn? International Airport  Cities in Czech Republic

Country: Czech Republic